Victoria’s Secret, founded with the idea that men should feel more comfortable shopping for the women in their lives, is trying to reframe itself as a brand that’s actually made with female customers in mind. But that’s a tough message to deliver when most of your management is male. “There’s a big belief in the company that we need to evolve,” Victoria’s Secret Lingerie Chief Executive Officer John Mehas said during a question-and-answer period at the annual investor day in Columbus, Ohio. “We need to be led by her, for her.” Parent L Brands Inc. laid out a multipart — if still vague — plan Tuesday for turning around Victoria’s Secret: an updated brand strategy that’s more inclusive, a refreshed in-store experience and a still-in-development marketing overhaul that won’t alienate core shoppers. The irony of the male-dominated presentation wasn’t lost on shareholders who raised the issue with Bloomberg News during a break. Of the 11 speakers during the L Brands event, excluding an introduction from Amie Preston from investor relations, just three were women. And only one gave a presentation: Amy Hauk, CEO of Victoria’s Secret’s Pink line. One investor, who asked not ...