Drywall is a great building material, but it’s relatively easy to damage. Maybe you’re missing a doorstop on one of your rooms and one of your energetic kids has swung a doorknob into the wall, or perhaps you’ve made a nice gash with the corner of a table while moving some furniture around. Regardless of the cause of the damage, repairing a large hole in drywall is an easy task. This video shows how small holes are handled. You might be familiar with this method. If not, you’ll be glad you checked it out. This article is short on the details of mudding the joints created by the patch and advocates using mesh tape. I advise against mesh for a couple of reasons- it’s very thick, so it requires feathering the mud farther out into the undamaged wall, and its woven texture makes it difficult to get the feathering smooth. I recommend FibaFuse, which can be difficult to find. The Big Orange Box lists it, but rarely has it in stock. It’s twice as expensive as paper tape, but well worth it for repairs. If desired, it can be used in most drywall tools. FibaFuse is a smooth, non-woven glass tape, thinner than even paper tape, so it’s easier to feather; often 3-4″ o...