A warm welcome to the latest edition of the Vent-Axia Specification Range catalogue.  As part of the ongoing

A warm welcome to the latest edition of the Vent-Axia Specification Range catalogue.  As part of the ongoing drive for energy efficiency within Europe, ventilation devices over 30 Watts come under the scope of the Energy Related Products Directive that came into force on 1st January 2016. The legislation sets minimum performance criteria across a range of fans and ventilation devices under two sets of legislation; ‘residential’ ventilation and ‘non-residential’ ventilation. As a result of the legislation we have reviewed our products and where required made updates to ensure they comply. In line with Vent-Axia’s drive to provide the best solution for our customer, we have taken the opportunity to update and improve some products at the same time as bringing the products in-line with ErP regulations. We have also improved the way we supply some of them – giving you more choice and flexibility over how you stock and sell the products. This edition of our Specification Range catalogue shows the continued investment we are making in our products and services to improve and add to our already comprehensive range. In this catalogue, we have bought together our Lo-Carbon resident...

Fail Of The Week: A Candle Caused Browns Ferry Nuclear Incident

A colleague of mine used to say he juggled a lot of balls; steel balls, plastic balls, glass balls, and paper balls. The trick was not to drop the glass balls. How do you know which is which? For example, suppose you were tasked with making sure a nuclear power plant was safe. What would be important? A fail-safe way to drop the control rods into the pile, maybe? A thick containment wall? Two loops of cooling so that only the inner loop gets radioactive? I’m not a nuclear engineer, so I don’t know, but ensuring electricians at a nuclear plant aren’t using open flames wouldn’t be high on my list of concerns. You might think that’s really obvious, but it turns out if you look at history that was a glass ball that got dropped. In the 1960s and 70s, there was a lot of optimism in the United States about nuclear power. Browns Ferry — a Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) nuclear plant — broke ground in 1966 on two plants. Unit 1 began operations in 1974, and Unit 2 the following year. By 1975, the two units were producing about 2,200 megawatts of electricity. That same year, an electrical inspector and an electrician were checking for air leaks in the spreading room — a space where cont...